Edited Script

Much Ado About Nothing Script by Joya Rankins

  • ACT 3. SCENE 2

MUSIC:

Joya, Amanda, and Lucy inside classroom

HALLWAY

DON JOHN

My lord and brother, God save you!

DON PEDRO

Good den, brother.

DON JOHN

If your leisure served, I would speak with you.

DON PEDRO

In private?

DON JOHN

If it please you: yet Count Claudio may hear; for

what I would speak of concerns him.

DON PEDRO

What’s the matter?

ENTER CLAUDIO

DON JOHN

[To CLAUDIO] Means your lordship to be married

to-morrow?

DON PEDRO

You know he does.

DON JOHN

I know not that, when he knows what I know.

CLAUDIO

If there be any impediment, I pray you discover it.

DON JOHN

You may think I love you not: let that appear

hereafter, and aim better at me by that I now will

manifest. For my brother, I think he holds you

well, and in dearness of heart hath holp to effect

your ensuing marriage;–surely suit ill spent and

labour ill bestowed.

DON PEDRO

Why, what’s the matter?

DON JOHN

I came hither to tell you; and, circumstances

shortened, for she has been too long a talking of,

the lady is disloyal.

CLAUDIO

Who, Hero?

DON PEDRO

Can this be? Leonato’s Hero, your Hero, every man’s Hero:

CLAUDIO

Disloyal?

DON JOHN

The word is too good to paint out her wickedness; I

could say she were worse: think you of a worse

title, and I will fit her to it. Wonder not till

further warrant: go but with me to-night, you shall

see her chamber-window entered, even the night

before her wedding-day: if you love her then,

to-morrow wed her; but it would better fit your honour

to change your mind.

CLAUDIO

May this be so?

DON PEDRO

I will not think it.

DON JOHN

If you dare not trust that you see, confess not

that you know: if you will follow me, I will show

you enough; and when you have seen more and heard

more, proceed accordingly.

CLAUDIO

If I see any thing to-night why I should not marry

her to-morrow in the congregation, where I should

wed, there will I shame her.

DON PEDRO

And, as I wooed for thee to obtain her, I will join

with thee to disgrace her.

DON JOHN

I will disparage her no farther till you are my

witnesses: bear it coldly but till midnight, and

let the issue show itself.

DON PEDRO

O day untowardly turned!

(WALKS INTO CLASSROOM)

CLAUDIO

O mischief strangely thwarting!

(WALKS INTO CLASSROOM)

DON JOHN

O plague right well prevented! so will you say when

you have seen the sequel.

(WALKS INTO CLASSROOM)

2.) ACT IV SCENE I. CLASSROOM. WEDNESDAY BACKGROUND. WEARING PINK

MUSIC:

Joya peaks head out door into doorway and says first line- class follows her into classroom

FRIAR FRANCIS

You come hither, my lord, to marry this lady.

CLAUDIO

No.

LEONATO

To be married to her: friar, you come to marry her.

Lady, you come hither to be married to this count.

HERO

I do.

FRIAR FRANCIS

If either of you know any inward impediment why you

should not be conjoined, charge you, on your souls,

to utter it.

CLAUDIO

Know you any, Hero?

HERO

None, my lord.

FRIAR FRANCIS

Know you any, count?

LEONATO

I dare make his answer, none.

CLAUDIO

O, what men dare do! what men may do! what men daily

do, not knowing what they do!

CLAUDIO

Stand thee by, friar. Father, by your leave:

Will you with free and unconstrained soul

Give me this maid, your daughter?

LEONATO

As freely, son, as God did give her me.

CLAUDIO

And what have I to give you back, whose worth

May counterpoise this rich and precious gift?

DON PEDRO

Nothing, unless you render her again.

CLAUDIO

Sweet prince, you learn me noble thankfulness.

There, Leonato, take her back again:

Give not this rotten orange to your friend;

She’s but the sign and semblance of her honour.

Behold how like a maid she blushes here!

O, what authority and show of truth

Can cunning sin cover itself withal!

Comes not that blood as modest evidence

To witness simple virtue? Would you not swear,

All you that see her, that she were a maid,

By these exterior shows? But she is none:

She knows the heat of a luxurious bed;

Her blush is guiltiness, not modesty.

LEONATO

What do you mean, my lord?

CLAUDIO

Not to be married,

Not to knit my soul to an approved wanton.

LEONATO

Dear my lord, if you, in your own proof,

Have vanquish’d the resistance of her youth,

And made defeat of her virginity,–

CLAUDIO

I know what you would say: if I have known her,

You will say she did embrace me as a husband,

And so extenuate the ‘forehand sin:

No, Leonato,

I never tempted her with word too large;

But, as a brother to his sister, show’d

Bashful sincerity and comely love.

HERO

And seem’d I ever otherwise to you?

CLAUDIO

Out on thee! Seeming! I will write against it:

You seem to me as Dian in her orb,

As chaste as is the bud ere it be blown;

But you are more intemperate in your blood

Than Venus, or those pamper’d animals

That rage in savage sensuality.

HERO

Is my lord well, that he doth speak so wide?

LEONATO

Sweet prince, why speak not you?

DON PEDRO

What should I speak?

I stand dishonour’d, that have gone about

To link my dear friend to a common stale.

LEONATO

Are these things spoken, or do I but dream?

DON JOHN

Sir, they are spoken, and these things are true.

HERO

True! O God!

CLAUDIO

Leonato, stand I here?

Is this the prince? is this the prince’s brother?

Is this face Hero’s? are our eyes our own?

LEONATO

All this is so: but what of this, my lord?

CLAUDIO

Let me but move one question to your daughter;

And, by that fatherly and kindly power

That you have in her, bid her answer truly.

LEONATO

I charge thee do so, as thou art my child.

HERO

O, God defend me! how am I beset!

What kind of catechising call you this?

CLAUDIO

To make you answer truly to your name.

HERO

Is it not Hero? Who can blot that name

With any just reproach?

CLAUDIO

Marry, that can Hero;

Hero itself can blot out Hero’s virtue.

What man was he talk’d with you yesternight

Out at your window betwixt twelve and one?

Now, if you are a maid, answer to this.

HERO

I talk’d with no man at that hour, my lord.

DON PEDRO

Why, then are you no maiden. Leonato,

I am sorry you must hear: upon mine honour,

Myself, my brother and this grieved count

Did see her, hear her, at that hour last night

Talk with a ruffian at her chamber-window

Who hath indeed, most like a liberal villain,

Confess’d the vile encounters they have had

A thousand times in secret.

DON JOHN

Fie, fie! they are not to be named, my lord,

Not to be spoke of;

There is not chastity enough in language

Without offence to utter them. Thus, pretty lady,

I am sorry for thy much misgovernment.

CLAUDIO

O Hero, what a Hero hadst thou been,

If half thy outward graces had been placed

About thy thoughts and counsels of thy heart!

But fare thee well, most foul, most fair! farewell,

Thou pure impiety and impious purity!

For thee I’ll lock up all the gates of love,

And on my eyelids shall conjecture hang,

To turn all beauty into thoughts of harm,

And never shall it more be gracious.

FRIAR FRANCIS

Lady, what man is he you are accused of?

HERO

They know that do accuse me; I know none:

If I know more of any man alive

Than that which maiden modesty doth warrant,

Let all my sins lack mercy! O my father,

Prove you that any man with me conversed

At hours unmeet, or that I yesternight

Maintain’d the change of words with any creature,

Refuse me, hate me, torture me to death!

(AMANDA CRUMBLES AND FAKES HER OWN DEATH)

FRIAR FRANCIS

There is some strange misprision in the princes.

LEONATO

I know not. If they speak but truth of her,

These hands shall tear her; if they wrong her honour,

The proudest of them shall well hear of it.

Time hath not yet so dried this blood of mine,

Nor age so eat up my invention,

Nor fortune made such havoc of my means,

Nor my bad life reft me so much of friends,

But they shall find, awaked in such a kind,

Both strength of limb and policy of mind,

Ability in means and choice of friends,

To quit me of them throughly.

FRIAR FRANCIS

Pause awhile,

And let my counsel sway you in this case.

Your daughter here the princes left for dead:

Let her awhile be secretly kept in,

And publish it that she is dead indeed;

Maintain a mourning ostentation

And on your family’s old monument

Hang mournful epitaphs and do all rites

That appertain unto a burial.

LEONATO

What shall become of this? what will this do?

FRIAR FRANCIS

Marry, this well carried shall on her behalf

Change slander to remorse; that is some good:

She dying, as it must so be maintain’d,

Upon the instant that she was accused,

Shall be lamented, pitied and excused

So will it fare with Claudio:

When he shall hear she died upon his words,

The idea of her life shall sweetly creep

Into his study of imagination,

And wish he had not so accused her.

The supposition of the lady’s death

Will quench the wonder of her infamy:

As best befits her wounded reputation,

In some reclusive and religious life,

Out of all eyes, tongues, minds and injuries.

3.) SCENE II. DETENTION IN CLASSROOM

WEDNESDAY

MUSIC:

DOGBERRY AND SEXTON STANDING

WATCHMEN SITTING

SEXTON WRITING IN NOTEBOOK

DOGBERRY

Yea, marry, that’s the eftest way. Let the watch

come forth. Masters, I charge you, in the prince’s

name, accuse these men.

First Watchman

This man said, sir, that Don John, the prince’s

brother, was a villain.

DOGBERRY

Write down Prince John a villain. Why, this is flat

perjury, to call a prince’s brother villain.

Pray thee, fellow, peace: I do not like thy look,

I promise thee.

Sexton

What heard you him say else?

Second Watchman

Marry, that he had received a thousand ducats of

Don John for accusing the Lady Hero wrongfully.

DOGBERRY

Flat burglary as ever was committed

Sexton

What else, fellow?

First Watchman

And that Count Claudio did mean, upon his words, to

disgrace Hero before the whole assembly. and not marry her.

DOGBERRY

O villain! thou wilt be condemned into everlasting

redemption for this.

Sexton

What else?

Watchman

This is all.

4.) ACT 5 SCENE1

MUSIC:

CLASSROOM THURSDAY

DOGBERRY

Come you, sir: if justice cannot tame you, she

shall ne’er weigh more reasons in her balance: nay,

an you be a cursing hypocrite once, you must be looked to.

DON PEDRO

How now? two of my brother’s men bound! Borachio

one!

CLAUDIO

Hearken after their offence, my lord.

DON PEDRO

Officers, what offence have these men done?

DOGBERRY

Marry, sir, they have committed false report;

moreover, they have spoken untruths; secondarily,

they are slanders; sixth and lastly, they have

belied a lady; thirdly, they have verified unjust

things; and, to conclude, they are lying knaves.

DON PEDRO

First, I ask thee what they have done; thirdly, I

ask thee what’s their offence; sixth and lastly, why

they are committed; and, to conclude, what you lay

to their charge.

CLAUDIO

Rightly reasoned, and in his own division: and, by

my troth, there’s one meaning well suited.

DON PEDRO

Who have you offended, masters, that you are thus

bound to your answer? this learned constable is

too cunning to be understood: what’s your offence?

BORACHIO

Sweet prince, let me go no farther to mine answer:

do you hear me, and let this count kill me. I have

deceived even your very eyes: what your wisdoms

could not discover, these shallow fools have brought

to light: who in the night overheard me confessing

to this man how Don John your brother incensed me

to slander the Lady Hero, how you were brought into

the orchard and saw me court Margaret in Hero’s

garments, how you disgraced her, when you should

marry her: my villany they have upon record; which

I had rather seal with my death than repeat over

to my shame. The lady is dead upon mine and my

master’s false accusation; and, briefly, I desire

nothing but the reward of a villain.

CLAUDIO

Sweet Hero! now thy image doth appear

In the rare semblance that I loved it first.

DOGBERRY

Come, bring away the plaintiffs: by this time our

sexton hath reformed Signior Leonato of the matter:

and, masters, do not forget to specify, when time

and place shall serve, that I am an ass.

LEONATO

No, not so, villain; thou beliest thyself:

Here stand a pair of honourable men;

A third is fled, that had a hand in it.

I thank you, princes, for my daughter’s death:

Record it with your high and worthy deeds:

‘Twas bravely done, if you bethink you of it.

CLAUDIO

I know not how to pray your patience;

Yet I must speak. Choose your revenge yourself;

Impose me to what penance your invention

Can lay upon my sin: yet sinn’d I not

But in mistaking.

DON PEDRO

By my soul, nor I:

And yet, to satisfy this good old man,

I would bend under any heavy weight

That he’ll enjoin me to.

LEONATO

I cannot bid you bid my daughter live;

That were impossible: but, I pray you both,

Possess the people in Messina here

How innocent she died; and if your love

Can labour ought in sad invention,

Hang her an epitaph upon her tomb

And sing it to her bones, sing it to-night:

To-morrow morning come you to my house,

And since you could not be my son-in-law,

Be yet my nephew: my brother hath a daughter,

Almost the copy of my child that’s dead,

And she alone is heir to both of us:

Give her the right you should have given her cousin,

And so dies my revenge.

CLAUDIO

O noble sir,

Your over-kindness doth wring tears from me!

I do embrace your offer; and dispose

For henceforth of poor Claudio.

LEONATO

To-morrow then I will expect your coming;

To-night I take my leave. This naughty man

Shall face to face be brought to Margaret,

Who I believe was pack’d in all this wrong,

Hired to it by your brother.

5.) SCENE 4. FRIDAY, DANCE, LIGHTS DIMMED

MUSIC: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mb2Qe2Hs0sw&list=PL9VcywyXkkvcfhugG11vffE2b12iYRXaK&index=8

FRIAR FRANCIS

Did I not tell you she was innocent?

LEONATO

So are the prince and Claudio, who accused her

Upon the error that you heard debated:

But Margaret was in some fault for this,

Although against her will, as it appears

In the true course of all the question.

Well, daughter, and you gentle-women all,

Withdraw into a chamber by yourselves,

And when I send for you, come hither mask’d.

Exeunt Ladies

Enter DON PEDRO and CLAUDIO,

Good morrow, prince; good morrow, Claudio:

We here attend you. Are you yet determined

To-day to marry with my brother’s daughter?

CLAUDIO

I’ll hold my mind, were she an Ethiope.

LEONATO

Call her forth, brother; here’s the friar ready.

CLAUDIO

For this I owe you: here comes other reckonings.

Re-enter Hero masked

Which is the lady I must seize upon?

LEONATO

This same is she, and I do give you her.

CLAUDIO

Why, then she’s mine. Sweet, let me see your face.

LEONATO

No, that you shall not, till you take her hand

Before this friar and swear to marry her.

CLAUDIO

Give me your hand: before this holy friar,

I am your husband, if you like of me.

HERO

And when I lived, I was your other wife:

Unmasking

And when you loved, you were my other husband.

CLAUDIO

Another Hero!

HERO

Nothing certainer:

One Hero died defiled, but I do live,

And surely as I live, I am a maid.

DON PEDRO

The former Hero! Hero that is dead!

LEONATO

She died, my lord, but whiles her slander lived.

FRIAR FRANCIS

All this amazement can I qualify:

When after that the holy rites are ended,

I’ll tell you largely of fair Hero’s death:

Meantime let wonder seem familiar,

And to the chapel let us presently.

Dance

Characters By Scene:

  1. Don john: Kayla
  2. Don pedro: Abdi
  3. Claudio: Teddy
  1. Friar: Joya
  2. Claudio: Teddy
  3. Leonato- Lucy
  4. Hero: Amanda
  5. Don pedro: Abdi
  6. Don john: Kayla
  1. Sexton-TEDDY
  2. Dogberry-Kayla
  3. Watchman- Lucy
  4. Watchman 2- Joya
  1. Dogberry:Kayla
  2. Don pedro: abdi
  3. Claudio: Teddy
  4. sBorachio: Joya
  5. Leonato: Lucy
  1. Friar: Joya
  2. Leonato: Lucy
  3. Claudio: Teddy
  4. Hero: amanda
  5. Don pedro: Abdi